Welcome to the Health and Relationship Processes (HARP) Lab!

Our research falls within the domain of social psychology and investigates how close relationship dynamics are linked to psychological and physical health and well-being

The HARP Lab is led by Dr. Sarah Stanton at the University of Edinburgh

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Recent Lab News

 

October 1, 2018

With Dr. Allison Farrell (Wayne State University) and Dr. Jeffry Simpson (University of Minnesota), Dr. Sarah Stanton is guest editing a special issue of Personal Relationships on mechanisms linking relationships and physical health to be published in 2020. [OFFICIAL CALL FOR PAPERS]

September 26, 2018

Paper entitled "Self-Disclosure and Perceived Responsiveness among Youth with Asthma: Links to Affect and Anti-Inflammatory Gene Expression" accepted at Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin.

September 18, 2018

Siyu Chen, Karen Twiselton, and Dr. Sarah Stanton presented talks at the biannual meeting of the UK Attachment Network in Swansea, United Kingdom.

July 31, 2018

Paper entitled "Adult Attachment and Trust in Romantic Relationships" accepted at Current Opinion in Psychology.

 

July 12-16, 2018

Mayu Koike, Karen Twiselton, and Dr. Sarah Stanton presented talks at the biennial meeting of the International Association for Relationship Research in Fort Collins, Colorado, USA.

 

July 4, 2018

Congratulations to Karen Twiselton, who received a Gray Publication Prize from the School of Philosophy, Psychology, and Language Sciences at the University of Edinburgh.

 

July 2, 2018

Congratulations to Flora Bills, Kirsty Brown, Jenni Kahkonen, and Kate Stafford, who graduated from the University of Edinburgh with honors in Psychology and are now HARP Lab alumni.

 

June 18, 2018

Paper entitled "Affective Processes as Mediators of Links between Close Relationships and Physical Health" accepted at Social and Personality Psychology Compass.

 

June 13, 2018

Paper entitled "Perceived Partner Responsiveness, Daily Negative Affect Reactivity, and All-Cause Mortality: A 20-Year Longitudinal Study" accepted at Psychosomatic Medicine.